Tag Archives: Performance

Oli Sorenson: La Société de la Place des Spectacles at POPOP Gallery, Montréal

OS_SPS_Demo004_564
Image courtesy of Oli Sorenson

Oli Sorenson
La Société de la Place des Spectacles

4 – 13 December 2014
at POPOP Gallery, Montréal

Vernissage: Saturday 6 December 2014, 14h – 17h
Performance: Saturday 6 December 2014, 16h

“[…] the very means of damaging these monitors in a performative context, to leave these marks will give exclusive properties to each of them: products of mass consumption will be transformed into unique objects …” (O. Sorenson)

Lodged under the signs of paradox, Oli Sorenson’s performance entitled La Société de la Place des Spectacles is presented on December 6th at 4 pm in Montreal’s Belgo Building. This performance taps right at the heart of spectacular fervor, while investing in the denial his own representation by continuing his series of “revisited works.” This corpus, triggered by a will to comment on the existing work of other creators as much as mass-produced objects, is here explored under the logic of destruction. Strangely, Sorenson’s exercise in transfiguration aspires to restore a stamp of uniqueness onto already original creations. Read more »

Opportunities: Call for papers “Envisioning the Practice” International symposium on performing arts curation

ACAQ_564
Image courtesy the ACAQ.

Call for papers
Envisioning the Practice
International symposium on performing arts curation

Extended deadline: 15 June 2013

A seminal event in the field of the performing arts, conceived by the Arts Curators Association of Québec (ACAQ), and hosted by the PHI Centre and the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Envisioning the Practice will be held in Montréal, Canada on 10–13 April 2014. The symposium is sponsored by Tangente, and collaborating partners Studio 303 and S.A.T. (La Société des arts technologiques) will offer programming for this special event.
Read more »

Hit and miss treasure hunt in the labyrinth – Art Souterrain 2013

AS2013_NathalieQuagliotto_the lost sign_3_564
Nathalie Quagliotto, Vous êtes ici / You are here, 2013. Photo by Nathalie Quagliotto.

The Labyrinth themed fifth edition of Art Souterrain indeed furnished a dazzle of art sceneries to mark seven kilometres underground pathways with over 120 artworks. Taking the topic to heart, many works denoted either a puzzling of the visual senses or forms of bewilderment within the self, between societies or geo-political conditions. Mélodie Prégent’s installation “Warren” (2013) combined adjacent mirrors and perspective photographs of empty corridors, stairways and tunnels to create illusions of endless passages. Loren Williams whimsically faked several tunnel entrances, not only to confuse or amuse the audience but also to suggest gateways to fantastic and imaginary worlds. Read more »

Material Traces at Leonard & Bina Ellen Gallery, Montréal


Heather Cassils, Becoming an Image, 2012. Photo documentation of performance. Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York. Photo by Heather Cassils and Eric Charles

Material Traces: Time and the Gesture in Contemporary Art
16 February – 13 April 2013
at Leonard & Bina Ellen Gallery, Montréal

Opening: Saturday 16 February 2013, 15h00 – 17h00
+
Performative event by Alicia Frankovich at 15h30

Curator: Amelia Jones

Artists: Francis Alÿs, Christopher Braddock, Heather Cassils, Juliana Cerqueira Leite, Andrew Dadson, Alexandre David, Paul Donald, Alicia Frankovich, Flutura and Besnik Haxhillari (The Two Gullivers), Mark Igloliorte, Tricia Middleton, Alex Monteith, Angel Vergara

Is art an object or a process? Is it “material” or “trace”? Shifts in art practice over the past 50 years, particularly in art world centers in Europe and the US, and more recently in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, have profoundly challenged Enlightenment to modern conceptions of the work of art, in European aesthetics, defined as an object, more or less static in meaning and value over time. Material Traces presents work from the past fifteen years by artists from around the world which draws on the legacy of performative intermedial practices from the 1960s and 1970s to foreground the processes and materiality of making, whether in wood, paint, performance, video, or other media. Read more »

Anahita Razmi “Automatic Assembly Actions” at Carbon 12, Dubai


Anahita Razmi, Arsenals, 2012. Installation view. Courtesy the artist and Carbon 12, Dubai

Anahita Razmi
Automatic Assembly Actions

14 January – 14 March 2013
at Carbon 12, Dubai

Many worlds collide in Razmi’s work: cultural spheres, semantic frameworks, art history, politics, and some of them together. Through appropriation of heritage, symbols, and even other artists ideas, contexts are redefined and concepts juxtaposed. Razmi attacks these systems directly, honestly and relentlessly. Free from conceptual restraints; any surplus is discarded until only the message itself remains.
Read more »

Fault Lines at SBC Gallery of Contemporary Art, Montréal


Francois Bucher, Forever Live: The Case of K. Gun, 2006. Video still. 17:51. Courtesy the artist and proyectos monclova, Mexico City

Fault Lines
6 December 2012 – 16 February 2013
at SBC Gallery of Contemporary Art, Montréal

Artists: Yael Bartana, Bertolt Brecht, François Bucher, Sophie Castonguay, Angela Melitopoulos & Maurizio Lazzarato

Curated by Pip Day

The exhibition Fault Lines/ Lignes de faille presents work that focuses on the power of speech, particularly in relation to dominant institutional discourse. Peopled with characters who come up against mechanisms of control of all sorts, work in the exhibition explores territorial, judicial and psychoanalytical grey areas: potential productive zones where alternative modes of resistance and of subjectivity can be constructed.
Read more »

Raphaëlle de Groot “Recent Works” at Galerie Graff, Montréal


Raphaëlle de Groot, Collections (E27), 2012. Digital print. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Graff

Raphaëlle de Groot
Recent Works

8 November – 8 December 2012
at Galerie Graff, Montréal

Le poids des objets [the weight of objects], first initiated in Lethbridge in 2009 and then expanded over a series of artist residencies and group exhibitions, now returns to Montreal under the guise of a full-scale solo exhibition, video and performance. The countless and varied objects gathered by the artist over the past three years, long forgotten by their many owners, have gained new life and purpose through their integration of Raphaëlle de Groot’s work. As their new caretaker, she holds, sorts, photographs, handles and carries each and every one them; they are now her collection. [read the full text here]
Read more »

Collapsing foundations – in conversation with Haig Aivazian


Haig Aivazian, Collapsing Foundations, 2010-Ongoing. Courtesy the artist and Parisian Laundry

Beirut-born, NY-based artist and curator Haig Aivazian is now showing his ongoing project at Parisian Laundry’s bunker space. “Collapsing Foundations” is a multi-part project comprised of written text, sculpture, drawing, video and a lecture performance, all of which seek to answer the following question: Can one erect a monument to an individual who has already erased the traces of his life’s work? Initiated from the CAD drawings of the artist’s late architect father, Aivazian here evaluates the potentials of languages and materiality, examines the notion of legacy and explores the relationships between private and public, through a wider body of research and various forms of presentations. M-KOS interviewed Aivazian during the opening of his exhibition.

M-KOS [MKOS]: How did “Collapsing Foundations” start off?

Haig Aivazian [HA]: I’ve been thinking about this project for several years now. Initially it was a fairly academic paper that I wrote. I had these drawings my father had done that I needed to do something with. I knew there was a potential in them but I wasn’t quite sure what to do with them. I wanted to explore the lines, explore them almost formally. I was thinking about drawing parallels between the collapse of a building and the collapse of a body, but mostly I was interested in the collapse of language in these moments: At the approach of death, what happens to language? What happens when we speak? What is our relationship to death as we speak? So I got interested in this idea of the very act of speaking, as an effort to ward off death. But the more we spoke, the more we are approaching death. So those are some of the ideas at the beginning point.
Read more »